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CARES Act will provide billions of dollars of relief to individuals, businesses, state and local governments and the health care system

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 30 2020
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After extensive negotiations between the U.S. House of Representatives, the U.S. Senate and the White House, an agreement has been reached on a massive stimulus bill to address the financial and health care crisis resulting from the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.
 
As of this writing, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) has been passed by the Senate and is expected to be passed by the House, although the mechanics are still to be determined because most House members are currently in their home districts. The President has indicated that he will sign the legislation.
 
The CARES Act includes a “Marshall Plan” for the health care system to help provide needed treatment during the pandemic and financial assistance to state, local, tribal and territorial governments, as well as to private nonprofits providing critical and essential services. It also provides significant relief to individuals, businesses and other employers to help them weather the pandemic.
 
Key provisions for individuals, businesses and other employers
Here’s a quick look at some of the CARES Act provisions that may affect you — keep in mind that it’s possible that some provisions could change before the act is signed into law:
 
Individuals
Recovery rebates of up to $1,200 for singles, $1,200 for heads of households and $2,400 for married couples filing jointly — plus $500 per qualifying child — subject to income-based phaseouts starting at $75,000, $122,500 and $150,000, respectively
Expansion of unemployment benefits, including for self-employed and gig-economy workers
Waiver of the 10% penalty on COVID-19-related early distributions from IRAs, 401(k)s and certain other retirement plans
Waiver of required minimum distribution rules for IRAs, 401(k)s and certain other retirement plans
Expansion of charitable contribution tax deductions
Exclusion for certain employer payments of student loans
 
Businesses and other employers
 
Retention tax credit for eligible employers that continue to pay employee wages while their operations are fully or partially suspended as a result of certain COVID-19-related government orders
Deferral of the employer portion of payments of certain payroll taxes
Modification of net operating loss (NOL) and limitation on losses rules
Modification of the deduction limitation on business interest
Qualified improvement property technical correction, allowing qualifying interior improvements of buildings to be immediately expensed rather than depreciated over a period of years
Expansion of the ways the Small Business Administration (SBA) can help small businesses
 
More details to come
This is just a brief overview of the CARES Act. We will share additional details on the provisions that are likely most relevant to you or your business in the coming days. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out to us with questions or concerns you have about taxes or your individual financial or business situation

Individuals Get Coronavirus (COVID) Tax and Other Relief

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 26 2020

    Taxpayers now have more time to file their tax returns and pay any tax owed because of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The Treasury Department and IRS announced that the federal income tax filing due date is automatically extended from April 15, 2020, to July 15, 2020. Taxpayers can also defer making federal income tax payments, which are due on April 15, 2020, until July 15, 2020, without penalties and interest, regardless of the amount they owe. This deferment applies to all taxpayers, including individuals, trusts and estates, corporations and other non-corporate tax filers as well as those who pay self-employment tax. They can also defer their initial quarterly estimated federal income tax payments for the 2020 tax year (including any self-employment tax) from the normal April 15 deadline until July 15. No forms to file.

Taxpayers don’t need to file any additional forms to qualify for the automatic federal tax filing and payment relief to July 15. However, individual taxpayers who need additional time to file beyond the July 15 deadline, can request a filing extension by filing Form 4868. Businesses who need additional time must file Form 7004. Contact us if you need assistance filing these forms. If you expect a refund Of course, not everybody will owe the IRS when they file their 2019 tax returns. If you’re due a refund, you should file as soon as possible. The IRS has stated that despite the COVID-19 outbreak, most tax refunds are still being issued within 21 days.

New law passes, another on the way On March 18, 2020, President Trump signed the “Families First Coronavirus Response Act,” which provides a wide variety of relief related to COVID-19. It includes free testing, waivers and modifications of Federal nutrition programs, employment-related protections and benefits, health programs and insurance coverage requirements, and related employer tax credits and tax exemptions. If you’re an employee, you may be eligible for paid sick leave for COVID-19 related reasons. Here are the specifics, according to the IRS: An employee who is unable to work because of a need to care for an individual subject to quarantine, to care for a child whose school is closed or whose child care provider is unavailable, and/or the employee is experiencing substantially similar conditions as specified by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services can receive two weeks (up to 80 hours) of paid sick leave at 2/3 the employee’s pay. An employee who is unable to work due to a need to care for a child whose school is closed, or child care provider is unavailable for reasons related to COVID-19, may in some instances receive up to an additional ten weeks of expanded paid family and medical leave at 2/3 the employee’s pay.

As of this writing, Congress was working on passing another bill that would provide additional relief, including checks that would be sent to Americans under certain income thresholds. We will keep you updated about any developments. In the meantime, please contact us with any questions or concerns about your tax or financial situation. © 2020

CDC Foundation Has COVID-19 Guidelines for Nonprofits

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 20 2020

While global health and governmental agencies grapple with how best to fight the new coronavirus (COVID-19), nonprofit organizations worldwide are scrambling to figure out what steps they should take and how they can be helpful in this time of uncertainty. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is taking aggressive public health measures to help protect the health of Americans and assist international partners. Leaders at nonprofit organizations can also play a pivotal role at this critical time. COVID-19 is very dangerous, and we must take comprehensive and coordinated action to address it. Today, we must be diligent in our response as the outbreak continues to spread worldwide, including in the United States, and the economic consequences that follow.

What can nonprofit leaders do in this time of uncertainty and concern? I’d like to offer five steps or initiatives that leaders of all nonprofits and philanthropies can take or consider. Seek out the right information. The best source of up-to-date information on everything related to COVID-19 is the CDC website. It is a trusted source with information provided by CDC scientists. I know as I worked there and collaborate with them on an almost daily basis. Beyond CDC, look to your state and local public health departments. I was a state health commissioner for many years and coordinated a response to H1N1, and I know that state and local health departments offer accurate and timely infectious disease information. Dispel myths. We are living in an anxious time, and as leaders we must ensure not to create a panic. This is even more difficult in an era where anyone with a smart phone can share an opinion or create a storyline. Myths about the coronavirus, including all the remedies, protections, etc. will continue to proliferate. Social media, while it can be a powerful tool to provide timely updates and information, can also make the problem worse. As leaders, we can dispel many of the myths about the disease and use our platforms to get out the facts. Put into action good public health practices.

As employers, community partners and influencers, the nonprofit sector enjoys a tremendous amount of trust and respect. Ensure your employees, volunteers and ambassadors know what they can do to protect themselves, their communities and the people they serve. Putting into practice actions from staying home when sick to cleaning and disinfecting work areas and communal areas where services are provided can make a big difference. Make a financial grant. If your organization is in the position to do so, make a financial grant to strengthen public health and the response efforts. While increased funding is becoming available for public health agencies, governments cannot do it alone, particularly as the response moves from containment to mitigation. A collective response is needed to meet the rapidly evolving needs of COVID-19 — from communications campaigns to strengthening state and local health labs to providing equipment and supplies as well as supporting those in quarantine or those who are at high-risk from the dangers of COVID-19.

In any crisis situation, it takes an effort on the part of all sectors to mitigate the crisis and meet the needs of our communities and vulnerable populations. Collaborate with peer organizations. Nonprofit organizations and philanthropies have greater positive impact and can accomplish more collectively than individually. By aligning diverse interests and resources and leveraging the strengths of your organization with another, we can work together to fight this outbreak and support those affected. If your organization is in a position to partner with another nonprofit, please consider it. The nonprofit sector has been crucial in past emergency responses such as the Ebola and Zika outbreaks, and we can’t do it alone this time, either. From the outset of the COVID-19 outbreak, there has been confusion, concern and anxiety about the infectious disease with good reason. We should treat it as we would other past outbreaks — recognize that it has not respected borders or politics and requires a collective effort of government, individual and organizations. The resilience of our front line public health responders is amazing. The nonprofit community has the opportunity to support them and others affected by the COVID-19 outbreak by providing accurate information and working with the public health community to find innovative ways to offer support.

The 2019 Gift Tax Return deadline is coming up

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 12 2020

 

If you made large gifts to your children, grandchildren or other heirs last year, it’s important to determine whether you’re required to file a 2019 gift tax return. And in some cases, even if it’s not required to file one, it may be beneficial to do so anyway. Who must file? Generally, you must file a gift tax return for 2019 if, during the tax year, you made gifts: That exceeded the $15,000-per-recipient gift tax annual exclusion (other than to your U.S. citizen spouse), That you wish to split with your spouse to take advantage of your combined $30,000 annual exclusion, That exceeded the $155,000 annual exclusion for gifts to a noncitizen spouse, To a Section 529 college savings plan and wish to accelerate up to five years’ worth of annual exclusions ($75,000) into 2019, Of future interests — such as remainder interests in a trust — regardless of the amount, or Of jointly held or community property. Keep in mind that you’ll owe gift tax only to the extent that an exclusion doesn’t apply and you’ve used up your lifetime gift and estate tax exemption ($11.4 million for 2019). As you can see, some transfers require a return even if you don’t owe tax. Who might want to file? No gift tax return is required if your gifts for 2019 consisted solely of gifts that are tax-free because they qualify as: Annual exclusion gifts, Present interest gifts to a U.S. citizen spouse, Educational or medical expenses paid directly to a school or health care provider, or Political or charitable contributions. But if you transferred hard-to-value property, such as artwork or interests in a family-owned business, you should consider filing a gift tax return even if you’re not required to. Adequate disclosure of the transfer in a return triggers the statute of limitations, generally preventing the IRS from challenging your valuation more than three years after you file. April 15 deadline The gift tax return deadline is the same as the income tax filing deadline. For 2019 returns, it’s April 15, 2020 — or October 15, 2020, if you file for an extension. But keep in mind that, if you owe gift tax, the payment deadline is April 15, regardless of whether you file for an extension. If you’re not sure whether you must (or should) file a 2019 gift tax return, contact us. © 2020

How technology has changed the accounting industry

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 05 2020

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Caught in the middle

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 28 2020

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Is the product’s price right?

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 20 2020

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What weddings cost — and how to keep yours affordable

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 13 2020

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Researchers have found a downside to high employment rates

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 06 2020

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Help protect your personal information by filing your 2019 tax return early

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 16 2020

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The IRS is opening the 2019 individual income tax return filing season on Jan. 27. Even if you usually don’t file until closer to the April 15 deadline (or you file an extension), consider being an early-bird filer this year. It can potentially protect you from tax identity theft. In these scams, a thief uses another person’s personal information to file a fraudulent return early in the filing sea son and claim a bogus refund. Then, when the legitimate taxpayer files, the IRS rejects the return because one with the same information has already been filed for the year. If you file first, any would-be fraudulent returns will be rejected by the IRS, rather than yours.

 

When must your business file IRS Form 8300?

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 09 2020

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Budgeting facts and tips for individuals

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 03 2020

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New Year’s Eve can get expensive

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 26 2019

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Happy Holidays

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 19 2019

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Bring home tax savings with your bundle of joy

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 12 2019

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If you’re adopting a child, or you adopted one this year, there may be significant tax benefits available to offset the expenses. For 2019, adoptive parents may be able to claim a nonrefundable credit against their federal tax for up to $14,080 of “qualified adoption expenses” for each adopted child. (This amount is increasing to $14,300 for 2020.) The credit allowable for 2019 is phased out for taxpayers with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $211,160 ($214,520 for 2020). It is eliminated when AGI reaches $251,160 for 2019 ($254,520 for 2020). We can help ensure that you meet all the requirements to get the full benefit of the tax savings available to adoptive parents.

Accrual-based businesses: 5 ways to trim 2019 taxes

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 09 2019

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Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 06 2019

Your move - Motivate workers with gamification

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 02 2019

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Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 26 2019

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Watch out for vendors bearing gifts

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 21 2019

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Don't let e-commerce fraud steal your holiday spirit

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 14 2019

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Do mutual funds really offer "free money" in December?

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 07 2019

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Should your business beware the reaper?

Posted by Admin Posted on Oct 31 2019

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In the bank or under the bed?

Posted by Admin Posted on Oct 23 2019

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4 payroll management tips for growing companies

Posted by Admin Posted on Oct 17 2019

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What is the tax impact of your collectibles?

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 26 2019

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College costs keep going up and up ...

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 19 2019

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Welcome to the GIG Economy

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 13 2019

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This is no ordinary trust.

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 05 2019

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Expenses that teachers can and can’t deduct on their tax returns

Posted by Admin Posted on Aug 29 2019

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As teachers head back to school, they often pay expenses for which they don’t receive reimbursement. Fortunately, they may be able to deduct some of them on their tax returns. You don’t have to itemize your deductions to claim this “above-the-line” tax break. For 2019, educators can deduct up to $250 of eligible expenses that weren’t reimbursed. Eligible expenses include books, supplies, computer equipment, software, other classroom materials, and professional development courses. To be eligible, taxpayers must be kindergarten through grade 12 teachers, instructors, counselors, principals or aides. They must also work at least 900 hours a school year in an elementary or secondary school.

Let your business vehicle do the heavy lifting

Posted by Admin Posted on Aug 26 2019

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Paper or plastic?

Posted by Admin Posted on Aug 15 2019

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The tax implications of being a winner

Posted by Admin Posted on Aug 08 2019

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If you’re lucky enough to be a winner at gambling or the lottery, congratulations! But be aware there are tax consequences. You must report 100% of your winnings as taxable income. If you itemize deductions, you can deduct losses but only up to the amount of winnings. You report lottery winnings as income in the year you actually receive them. In the case of noncash prizes (such as a car), this would be the year the prize is received. With cash, if you take the winnings in annual installments, you only report each year’s installment as income for that year. These are just the basic rules. Contact us with questions. We can help you minimize taxes and stay in compliance with all requirements.

 

 

 

How women can bridge the retirement gap

Posted by Admin Posted on Aug 01 2019

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"Tax due" adds up fast if you don't withhold enough

Posted by Admin Posted on July 25 2019

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Test your financial literacy

Posted by Admin Posted on July 18 2019

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How early 20th century technology helped boost employee productivity

Posted by Admin Posted on July 11 2019

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You may have to pay tax on Social Security benefits

Posted by Admin Posted on July 03 2019

 

C
During your working days, you pay Social Security tax in the form of withholding from your salary or self-employment tax. And when you start receiving Social Security benefits, you may be surprised to learn that some of the payments may be taxed.
 
If you’re getting close to retirement age, you may be wondering if your benefits are going to be taxed. And if so, how much will you have to pay? The answer depends on your other income. If you are taxed, between 50% and 85% of your payments will be hit with federal income tax. (There could also be state tax.)
 
Important: This doesn’t mean you pay 50% to 85% of your benefits back to the government in taxes. It means that you have to include 50% to 85% of them in your income subject to your regular tax rates.
 
Calculate provisional income
 
To determine how much of your benefits are taxed, you must calculate your provisional income. It starts with your adjusted gross income on your tax return. Then, you add certain amounts (for example, tax-exempt interest from municipal bonds). Add to that the income of your spouse, if you file jointly. To this, add half of the Social Security benefits you and your spouse received during the year. The figure you come up with is your provisional income. Now apply the following rules:
 
If you file a joint tax return and your provisional income, plus half your benefits, isn’t above $32,000 ($25,000 for single taxpayers), none of your Social Security benefits are taxed.
 
If your provisional income is between $32,001 and $44,000, and you file jointly with your spouse, you must report up to 50% of your Social Security benefits as income. For single taxpayers, if your provisional income is between $25,001 and $34,000, you must report up to 50% of your Social Security benefits as income.
 
If your provisional income is more than $44,000, and you file jointly, you must report up to 85% of your Social Security benefits as income on Form 1040. For single taxpayers, if your provisional income is more than $34,000, the general rule is that you must report up to 85% of your Social Security benefits as income.
 
Caution: If you aren’t paying tax on your Social Security benefits now because your income is below the floor, or you’re paying tax on only 50% of those benefits, an unplanned increase in your income can have a significant tax cost. You’ll have to pay tax on the additional income, you’ll also have to pay tax on (or on more of) your Social Security benefits, and you may get pushed into a higher tax bracket.
 
For example, this might happen if you receive a large retirement plan distribution during the year or you receive large capital gains. With careful planning, you might be able to avoid this tax result.
 
Avoid a large tax bill
If you know your Social Security benefits will be taxed, you may want to voluntarily arrange to have tax withheld from the payments by filing a Form W-4V with the IRS. Otherwise, you may have to make estimated tax payments.
 
Contact us to help you with the exact calculations on whether your Social Security will be taxed. We can also help you with tax planning to keep your taxes as low as possible during retirement. © 2019

PAID PARENTAL LEAVE - Employers respond to increased worker demand

Posted by Admin Posted on June 27 2019

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How to handle an inheritance

Posted by Admin Posted on June 20 2019

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Donating your vehicle to charity may not be a taxwise decision

Posted by Admin Posted on June 13 2019

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Let’s say you’re buying a new car and want to get rid of your old one. You’ve heard ads claiming you can get a tax deduction for donating a car to charity. But this may not result in a big deduction — or any at all. It depends on whether you itemize and what the charity does with the vehicle. For cars worth more than $500, the deduction is the amount for which the charity sells the car. However, i f a charity uses the car in its operations or materially improves it before selling, your deduction is based on the car’s fair market value at the time of donating. You also must itemize deductions. You can’t claim a deduction if you take the standard deduction. Contact us for more details.

Thinking about moving to another state in retirement? Don’t forget about taxes

Posted by Admin Posted on June 07 2019

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If you’re thinking about relocating to another state in retirement, consider the impact of state and local taxes. It may seem like a state with no income tax is a smart choice, but you also have to factor in property and sales taxes, as well as any state estate tax. If you make a move to a new state and want to escape taxes in the state you came from, it’s important to establish legal domicile in the new location. How? Take steps such as buying a new home, changing your mailing address, registering to vote and getting a driver’s license in the new state. Before deciding where to live in retirement, do some research and contact us. We can help you avoid unpleasant tax surprises.

Making the best of BAD DEBT

Posted by Admin Posted on June 03 2019

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Check your withholding and make changes, if necessary

Posted by Admin Posted on May 24 2019

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Did you receive a refund this year that was smaller than you were expecting? Or did you wind up owing additional tax when you filed your return? That might mean it’s time to check and adjust your withholding. This might be necessary due to changes in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act or because something in your situation is different this year (for example, you got married, divorced, purchased a home or had changes in your income). The IRS has a withholding calculator where you can perform a paycheck checkup. You can access the calculator at https://bit.ly/2aLxK0A. Contact us if you need help determining whether you should adjust your 2019 withholding.

VETERANS ARE AMERICA’S ECONOMIC WEAPON

Posted by Admin Posted on May 21 2019

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Still working after age 70½? You may not have to begin 401(k) withdrawals

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 28 2019

If you participate in a qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(k), you must generally begin taking required withdrawals from the plan no later than April 1 of the year after which you turn age 70½. However, there’s an exception that applies to certain plan participants who are still working for the entire year in which they turn 70½.

The basics of RMDs

Required minimum distributions (RMDs) are the amounts you’re legally required to withdraw from your qualified retirement plans and traditional IRAs after reaching age 70½. Essentially, the tax law requires you to tap into your retirement assets — and begin paying taxes on them — whether you want to or not.

Under the tax code, RMDs must begin to be taken from qualified pension, profit sharing and stock bonus plans by a certain date. That date is April 1 of the year following the later of the calendar year in which an employee: Reaches age 70½, or retires from employment with the employer maintaining the plan under the “still working” exception.

Once they begin, RMDs must generally continue each year. The tax penalty for withdrawing less than the RMD amount is 50% of the portion that should have been withdrawn but wasn’t. However, there’s an important exception to the still-working exception. If owner-employees own at least 5% of the company, they must begin taking RMDs from their 401(k)s beginning at 70½, regardless of their work status.

The still-working rule doesn’t apply to distributions from IRAs (including SEPs or SIMPLE IRAs). RMDs from these accounts must begin no later than April 1 of the year following the calendar year such individuals turn age 70½, even if they’re not retired.

The law and regulations don’t state how many hours an employee needs to work in order to postpone 401(k) RMDs. There’s no requirement that he or she work 40 hours a week for the exception to apply. However, the employee must be doing legitimate work and receiving W-2 wages.

For a customized plan

The RMD rules for qualified retirement plans (and IRAs) are complex. With careful planning, you can minimize your taxes and preserve more assets for your heirs. If you’re still working after age 70½, it may be beneficial to delay taking RMDs but there could also be disadvantages. Contact us to customize the optimal plan based on your individual retirement and estate planning goals.

 

How ancient Incan bean counters counted... beans

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 21 2019

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WHAT'S IN YOUR (VIRTUAL) WALLET?

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 14 2019

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Americans abroad, living as locals

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 07 2019

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Turn that frown upside down

Posted by Admin Posted on Mar 01 2019

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Some of your deductions may be smaller (or nonexistent) when you file your 2018 tax return

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 22 2019

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While the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act reduces most income tax rates and expands some tax breaks, it may cause you to see these five itemized deductions shrink or disappear when you file your 2018 tax return: 1) state and local tax, 2) mortgage interest, 3) home equity debt interest, 4) miscellaneous, and 5) casualty and theft loss. The combination of a much larger standard deduction and smaller itemized deductions may mean that, even if itemizing has typically benefited you, you might now be better off taking the standard deduction. Contact us for details.

Because you believe in second chances

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 15 2019

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Why you shouldn’t wait to file your 2018 income tax return

Posted by Admin Posted on Feb 07 2019

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The IRS opened the 2018 income tax return filing season on Jan. 28. Consider filing as soon as you can, even if you typically don’t file this early. It can help protect you from tax identity theft, in which a thief files a return using your Social Security number to claim a bogus refund. If you file first, it will be returns filed by any would-be thieves that are rejected by the IRS, not yours. Ot her benefits: You’ll get your refund sooner or, if you owe tax, you’ll know how much you owe sooner so you can be ready to pay it by April 15. Contact us with questions.

Is your nonprofit ready for a raffle?

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 31 2019

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Raffles are popular fundraisers for not-for-profits. But they’re subject to strict tax rules. State laws on nonprofit-sponsored raffles vary, but you must comply with federal income tax requirements. First, you may owe unrelated business income tax unless your fundraiser is “substantially” staffed by volunteers. Second, raffle winnings must be reported to the IRS when the amount is $600 or more an d at least 300 times the raffle ticket price. Third, you need to withhold income tax from the winnings if the proceeds are more than $5,000. Contact us for details.

Taxpayers, start your engines!

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 24 2019

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Movin' on up

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 18 2019

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Charitable donations: Unraveling the mystery of motivation

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 14 2019

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Americans support charities for a variety of financial, emotional and social reasons, and some of them aren’t so obvious. For example, wealthy donors may be motivated by not only tax and asset protection considerations, but also a desire to limit what they leave to their children to prevent a “burden of wealth.” Younger donors often want to “make a difference,” and donors of all stripes are motiva ted by a desire to make an altruistic impression. These individuals are more likely to give when asked by someone they know or when their gift will be publicized.

How to spend less, much less, in 2019

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 03 2019

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You may be able to save more for retirement in 2019

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 28 2018
Retirement plan contribution limits are indexed for inflation, and most have increased for 2019. So you may have opportunities to increase your retirement savings. Limits for 401(k)s, SIMPLEs and IRAs increase by $500, to $19,000, $13,000 and $6,000, respectively. Catch-up contributions (for taxpayers age 50 or older) remain unchanged, however. They’re $6,000, $3,000 and $1,000, respectively. Additional factors may affect how much you’re allowed to contribute. For more on how to make the most of tax-advantaged retirement-saving opportunities in 2019, contact us.
 

FIXED vs ADJUSTABLE RATE MORTGAGES

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 20 2018

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Celebrate a successful year!

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 13 2018

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There's still time to reduce your 2018 tax bill

Posted by Admin Posted on Dec 06 2018

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Accounting Day Parties Can Get a Little Crazy

Posted by Admin Posted on Nov 01 2018

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So you've received a letter from the IRS ...

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 20 2018

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What it takes to be a Woman CPA

Posted by Admin Posted on Jan 22 2018

Welcome to Our Blog!

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 24 2013
This is the home of our new blog. Check back often for updates!

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